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the significance of what happened last night at that american consulate in benghazi. he is the first ambassador to be killed in the line of duty in the last three decades and only the sixth in the entire history of american diplomacy. tonight we're learning that his death and the deaths of three of his staffers may have come not at the hands of a random mob of islamic fundamentalists who were riled up, instead sources say that a pro-al qaeda group is the key suspect now and a senior u.s. official says american surveillance drones are expected to join in the hunt for them. the fbi is also investigating. as we said at the top of the program, american warships have begun steaming closer to libya. a marine yunlt is heading to trip loli to beef up the forces there. >> we're working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats. i have directed my administration to increase our security at diplomatic posts around the world. make no mistake, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attacked our people. >> well, later today after that speech on the cbs evening
for their rage. whatever the true motivations it's not just cairo anymore. not just benghazi, libya where four americans, including the u.s. ambassador to libya were killed in the turmoil. ambassador christopher stevens, state department computer expert sean smith, former navy s.e.a.l. glen doherty, and breaking news about the fourth victim. he has now been identified, tyron woods, a former navy s.e.a.l. as well. according to knsd, woods was from the area, from imperial beach, 41 years old. his ex-wife telling the station he loved being a s.e.a.l. more than life itself. we do have late developments on an arrest today in connection with his killing, as well as the search for additional suspects. and the libyans, many of whom have expressed shock and outrage over the killings. as we said, the anti-american flames are spreading. in addition to libya and egypt, there were protests as well today in yemen, sudan, iraq, morocco, gaza. at least 11 hotspots now including israel, iran, and the cash kashmir region by india. not just contained in the arab world anymore. the most dramatic and deadly erupti
in the ruins of the american consulate of benghazi, libya. tonight, we're the first it tell you why. the likely reason and from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not. today the director of national intelligence, james clapper, explained early evidence supported that theory, so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothly, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter s
wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection in other words, but that request was not granted. fran is a former white house homeland security adviser, served in the george w. bush administration. sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with mcandrews & forbes. and former fbi assistant director tom pointes who has extensive experience in investigating attacks overseas. so there was military protection to go into benghazi, why didn't they get it? >> the answer to the question is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you want to set up a security perimeter, you may look to the host country. if the host country is unable or unwilling to provide it, we don't know what the answer to that is, you may ask if you think you need it for u.s. military support, but that's got to go through a process. it needs state department and nsc support, the u.s. military would have to make an assessment about how big a security package that would entail and lastly, and perhaps most importantly, you need host government. the libyan gov
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)